Tallow for Eczema: Why It Works

Tallow for Eczema

Have you heard of tallow? If you’re suffering from itchy, red or scaly eczema, then you’ll want to check out this natural ingredient that has provided relief to many eczema sufferers. This week, we discuss the benefits of tallow for eczema, as well as provide recommendations on the best tallow balm, tallow cream and tallow soap to try!

What is Tallow?

If you never heard of tallow, then you’re definitely in for a treat. Tallow is a hard fatty substance that is rendered from pure animal fat. Unlike other forms of fat, it can be stored for long periods of time without the need for refrigeration (although it should be kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation).

It’s generally rendered from cattle fat and the texture resembles a hybrid of coconut oil and butter, which means its super moisturizing and rich.

Tallow has been used for a variety of treatments, soap recipes and much more for hundreds of years now. In fact, there’s evidence that the Babylonians, Mesopotamians and Egyptians all used animal fat, along with oils and salts to create soap [1]. To this day, it is still a widely used ingredient in traditional treatments, specifically for those catered to the Paleo diet. Read about our experience with AutoImmune Paleo and Eczema.

Because the fat rendered from animals can contain the most toxins, when choosing any animal derived products like emu or tallow for eczema, it’s best to make sure the animals are grass fed or pastured vs grain fed (which will not yield as many nutrients and minerals) and are not fed anything with genetically modified ingredients or other questionable ingredients.

Why Tallow for Eczema?

There are a number of benefits in using tallow for eczema. In fact, unlike other plant based products, tallow has many fat-soluble vitamins which can help alleviate redness, inflammation, irritation, cracked and scaly skin.

If you suffer from both itchy or scaly eczema, then tallow is a wonderful product to re-hydrate the skin. Because it is so rich and fatty, it can restore the skin barrier that is damaged in eczema patients. Tallow has also shown to work wonders for weeping eczema.

Different Types of Tallow Products

Tallow can be rendered into many different forms, depending on which areas of the body need to be treated. The most common forms are either tallow balm, tallow soap or tallow cream. One of the reasons we like tallow for eczema so much is that very little needs to be added to tallow to create a great, effective product – so that means most tallow products use less ingredients which means less chance of an allergic reaction. In fact, tallow products can be some of the best for the most sensitive of skin because of their limited, but very natural ingredients.

As stated above, always make sure your tallow products are derived from grass fed or pastured cows instead of grain and GMO fed.

Tallow Balm

The purpose of tallow balm is to treat, repair and nourish skin. This Grass Fed Tallow Balm is sourced from grass fed and finished cows. This balm is great for very allergic skin because the unscented version contains only TWO ingredients: Grass Fed Tallow and Extra Virgin Olive Oil, leaving very little room for an allergic reaction, especially because a tallow allergy is extremely rare.

Not only is this tallow balm extremely nourishing and moisturizing, but it can be used on even the most sensitive skin (like weeping eczema). The balm comes either unscented or with a Tea Tree & Lavender version with added essential oils. Lavender and Tea Tree Oil are both naturally antibiotic and antiseptic, which helps promote healing and prevent scarring, so it’s a great option too.

Tallow Soap

If you’re looking for a bar soap, then we suggest checking out this Grass Fed Tallow Soap. Use it in the shower for washing the entire body and as safe, gentle soap for those who suffer from hand eczema. While other soaps might strip skin of moisture, this fatty bar of soap is extremely nourishing.

This tallow soap also makes a great fatty lather for clean shaving for women and men!

Tallow Cream

Lastly, if you’re looking to keep skin moisturized (which is important for all types of eczema) and are used to a more typical , a tallow cream can be a great alternative to more plant based products. This tallow cream is also made with grass-fed cow tallow along coconut oil and some moisturizing and healing essential oils and can be used on the entire body to moisturize face, body, feet, hands and much more.

Not only is this tallow cream perfect for sensitive skin and many types of eczema, but can also be used on chapped, calloused, cracked, sun-damaged skin as well as wrinkles.

For more information on tallow and another ancient ingredient – pine tar, check out our blog post: Why You Should Try Tallow & Pine Tar for Eczema.

Have you tried tallow soap, balm or cream? Let us know what you think in the comments below!

Bio: Laura is a contributor and content developer for It’s An Itchy Little World. She is in no way a medical professional. Her comments, suggestions, and reflections are not intended to replace any medical advice. Always seek the help of a medical professional before undertaking any diet or lifestyle changes. Please see It’s An Itchy Little World’s disclaimer for information about affiliate links and more.

References

1. Soap History: History of Soap and Soap Interesting Facts. http://www.soaphistory.net/

1 Comment

  1. Renee on August 6, 2018 at 8:45 pm

    I have only just started to use tallow balm and have definitely noticed a difference. My plaques are less leathery and the skin in-between them is less red. I have to reapply the balm several times because the first couple of applications just sink right in. Since I use it on my whole body, I thin it out a little with olive oil to make it go farther. I can’t use the lotion because I have a latex food allergy and coconut oil is a no-no for me.

    One odd thing I’ve noticed is that the scars where my skin blistered and then healed turn dark purple with the balm and then they start to fade. Before, they would just be a dark pink, fading to lighter pink. Not sure what makes them turn purple but they heal so much faster than before, I’m not complaining!

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